Tag Archives: Colors

Sunday’s Snapshots: Max Patch Summit.

14 Oct

Finally made a trip up to Max Patch, my favorite place on Earth!

Photo Friday: The beginning of fall.

5 Oct

 

“In the end, though, maybe we must all give up trying to pay back the people in this world who sustain our lives. In the end, maybe it’s wiser to surrender before the miraculous scope of human generosity and to just keep saying thank you, forever and sincerely, for as long as we have voices.” -Elizabeth Gilbert

 

Monday’s Musings: October 1st!

1 Oct

Despite it being Monday, there are numerous things that have made me happy today:

  • Completing my annotated bibliography for my Community Psychology project on the social stigma of physical disabilities. If you’ve ever had to do an annotated bibliography, I’m sure you’re squirming at the thought of it. If you haven’t, count yourself lucky. I wish I could still be uninformed about all the effort and time that goes into making an annotated bibliography. I would explain it, but I’m relieved to be done with it, so that’s that. If you’re really curious, there is always Google.
  • The fact that it finally feels like Fall: complete with cool weather and changing leaves. Despite the rain and relative cloudiness today, it’s felt like the perfect Fall day. A pumpkin spice latte from Starbucks would seal the deal, but when is there time to go to Starbucks when I have so many other things that require my attention? Thankfully, I love college, and I’ve always loved learning.
  • A quick trip to Mr. K’s, my favorite used bookstore. Since I finished my annotated bibliography today (despite it not being due until Wednesday), I decided to treat myself to a quick trip to Mr. K’s. Since I have been wanting to read another book about writing after reading The Spirit of Writing: Classic and Contemporary Essays Celebrating the Writing Life, I settled for Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. After reading the first sentence of the Introduction, I couldn’t help but realize how much I’m going to love this book:

I grew up around a father and a mother who read every chance they got, who took us to the library every Thursday night to load up on books for the coming week.-Anne Lamott

  • It’s the beginning of a new month. Though this may seem like something small that made my Monday enjoyable, I’m always excited to welcome a new month. A new month means new experiences, new memories to be made, and yet another month that I get to live and breathe among the Blue Ridge Mountains that I love so much. And as the leaves begin to change, I feel even more lucky that I get to call this place home.

Photo Friday: Shadows.

28 Sep

The arrival of autumn.

24 Sep

After a drive on the Blue Ridge Parkway yesterday enjoying the beautiful weather, I’m welcoming the gradual change of colors I saw along the curvy mountain roads as well as the cooler weather in the mornings that begin to require long-sleeve shirts and hoodies. Autumn is just my favorite time of year! 🙂

Downtown photoshoot.

22 Sep

I went downtown with my friend Olive yesterday evening to get some artsy shots while the light was good. Enjoy! 🙂

 

 

 

Fall and Flannery O’Connor.

17 Sep

The coming of fall. Photograph taken by my friend, Olive.

Where you come from is gone, where you thought you were going to was never there, and where you are is no good unless you can get away from it.-Flannery O’Connor

Shooting off in all directions.

30 Aug

I wanted change and excitement and to shoot off in all directions myself, like the colored arrows from a Fourth of July rocket.-Sylvia Plath

Photo Friday: Leave A Trail.

8 Jun

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Finding Daddy Cox By Mike Cox: A Book Review.

6 May

In previous posts, I’ve mentioned Mike, one of my writing mentors that I met when interning at the Columbia Star newspaper in January of 2009. When I left my internship at the Star, Mike gave me 3 books as parting gifts, one of which was his own book he wrote in 2003, Finding Daddy Cox.

Finding Daddy Cox is the story of Mike’s grandfather, Cecil Cox, which includes all the lessons that he instilled in his children and grandchildren that are still evident in the Cox family today. I remember Mike telling me how he wrote this book for his family, and as a token of remembrance for the grandfather that he resembled, but who died when he was five years old. There are parts of the book that have still stuck with me, like Cecil’s conversation with a blind man where he describes every part of the sunset so that the blind man is able to enjoy it as well. I think that was one of my favorite parts of the book. Overall, Finding Daddy Cox is full of life lessons that you’d expect to hear from an old Southern family: discipline your children but show them you love them, the importance of hard work, how to deal with pain, loss, and fear, and the realization that one’s family is the cornerstone to all of life’s understandings. Even though Finding Daddy Cox was essentially a collection of stories that Mike had heard about his grandfather as he was growing up, Mike put his some of his own self into the stories as well since he had heard his whole life how much he and Cecil Cox were alike.

I think what was most interesting to me was reading a book that was written by someone I know. I could hear Mike’s voice through the words, and that was really cool for me. Though the book was stories of his grandfather, I could see how Mike used his own writing style in certain descriptions of things, though I’m sure he had plenty of help from the people in his family who were still around at the time who assisted him with the stories.

I definitely recommend this book. I mean, I guess it’s different for me because I am friends with Mike, and so I know him pretty well. However, Finding Daddy Cox was a great portrayal of an Old Southern family and how certain traditions and ways of upbringing can have such a long-lasting effect on the generations to come.